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FAIRPHONE LAUNCHES FAIRPHONE 3 TO SHOW THERE IS A REAL SUSTAINABLE SMARTPHONE ALTERNATIVE

Dutch social enterprise Fairphone have announced the launch of their latest smartphone: the Fairphone 3. The new, improved modular phone builds on the company’s previous achievements to deliver a sleek and durable device that closes the gap between performance and sustainability.

The phone is made with responsibly sourced and conflict-free tin and tungsten, recycled copper and plastics, and sources Fairtrade gold.

Fairphone was the first electronics manufacturer to integrate Fairtrade gold into its supply chain. Fairtrade gold drives environmental benefits for miners and their communities and delivers a Fair Price and Premium for re-investment into mine and community projects.

Fairphone is also in the process of setting up an initiative for better sourcing of cobalt, the key mineral for the energy transition.

https://www.fairtrade.org.uk/Media-Centre/News/Fairphone-launches-Fairphone-3-to-show-there-is-a-real-sustainable-smartphone-alternative

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How coffee farming is supporting the indigenous population of Guatemala……

In Guatemala, indigenous people make up around 40% of the population, most of whom are of Mayan descent.

Social and economic inequality is widespread among indigenous people in Guatemala and the majority work on small-scale coffee farms. The country’s main exports are coffee beans, sugar and bananas. Historically, Guatemala’s coffee exports have been dominated by large foreign-owned plantations rather than small coffee farms, which has meant that the exporter or the intermediary can take advantage of the farmers, pushing down prices for their crops, often leaving them in poverty and with few other options but to sell up and migrate.

That’s why many co-operatives and small coffee producers team up, like the 20,000 small coffee producers who market their coffee through the Federación de Pequeños Productores de Café de Guatemala (also known as FEDECOCAGUA R.L.). This organisation consists of 148 different co-operatives and it gives farmers better access to global and direct trade. As a result, around 50% of all coffee produced in the country is now from small family-owned coffee farms.

These farmers are now paid fairly for their work and, by creating a community based on fair trade and social inclusion, they are able to work collaboratively whilst maintaining independence.

Read more at: https://www.fairtrade.org.uk/

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Lets celebrate Fairtrade Fortnight 2019

Fairtrade Fortnight: all about chocolate

Saturday 2nd March, 10am-12pm at Guille-Allés Library

A family event aimed at 4-11-year-olds to celebrate and learn all about cocoa and chocolate. Who grows cocoa and where? What are their lives like? How are the beans made into chocolate? How can we make the industry fairer for farmers?

There will be activities, crafts and films to help find the answers to all of these questions, a guided sensory chocolate tasting, and a chocolate-themed story time at 11am.

 

 

 

 

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Major names pledge to use 100% sustainable cotton by 2025

23 more of the world’s most renowned clothing and textile companies, including Burberry, Adidas, Kathmandu and Timberland today pledged to use 100% sustainable cotton by 2025.
This initiative recognises several existing standards as delivering sustainable cotton: Organic, Fairtrade, Better Cotton Initiative (BCI), Cotton Made in Africa and recycled cotton certified to an independently verifiable standard such as the Global Recycled Standard (GRS) or the Recycled Claim Standard (RCS). In addition, CottonConnect’s REEL programme and code provides a starting point for businesses aiming for greater sustainability in their cotton supply chain.
36 major brands and retailers have now signed up to the 100% by 2025 pledge, including four of Forbes magazine’s list of the world’s ten largest global apparel brands , and three of the top 10 UK clothing retailers. This announcement was made at the annual Textile Exchange Sustainability Conference, where more than 400 textile and apparel leaders have come together to discuss the most important sustainability issues facing the industry.
This pledge – called the sustainable cotton communiqué – demonstrates that there is a demand for more sustainable cotton, and the commitment made by companies will help to drive sustainable practices across the sector. In turn, this will help alleviate the environmental and social costs that are too often associated with cotton production, including the over-use of pesticides, the release of greenhouse gases, the depletion of local water sources and rising costs of production.
The brands that have committed to the 100% by 2025 pledge are: ASOS, EILEEN FISHER, Greenfibres, H&M, IKEA, Kering, Levi’s, Lindex, M&S, Nike, Sainsbury’s, F&F at Tesco, Woolworths, Adidas, A-Z, BikBOk, Burberry, Burton Snowboards, Carlings, Coyuchi, Cubus, Days like This, Dressmann, Hanky Panky, House of Fraser, Indigenous Designs, KappAhl, Kathmandu, Mantis World, Otto Group, prAna, SkunkFunk, Timberland, Urban, Volt and Wow.
Impact
There have been substantial gains made over the past few years in scaling the production of more sustainable forms of cotton, which is now higher than ever at over 3 million tonnes in 2016. However, companies are actively sourcing less than a fifth of this available sustainable cotton. In order for sustainable cotton to become standard business practice, the amount of sustainable cotton grown and bought must increase significantly. This pledge sends a signal to millions of producers that there is a real demand for a more sustainable approach to cotton production that reduces the environmental and social costs.
The companies that have pledged their support are at various stages on their journey to using sustainable cotton, with some already securing all of their cotton from sustainable sources. However, all are clear that collaboration across the sector is needed to bring about transformative change.
Quotes from selected companies and NGO representatives:
“The industry is awakening to the necessity of sustainably grown cotton. It is great to see additional brands joining this initiative to accelerate the momentum of cotton production in a way that will positively impact smallholder farmers, water quality and soil health.” La Rhea Pepper, Managing Director, Textile Exchange
“As a pioneer in organic cotton bedding, Coyuchi cares immensely about what our sheets, towels and apparel are made of and its greater impact on the environment and the hands that touch it from earth to factory to home. Coyuchi is excited to join the pledge and the growing momentum by likeminded brands committed to a more sustainable future.” Eileen Mockus, CEO, Coyuchi
“Burton has a responsibility to protect the people and playground that sustain our sport and lifestyle. We recognize that there are social and environmental costs associated with producing our products. We are continuously striving toward sustainability in our production practices, including the materials we source. Burton is proud to join other industry leaders in this pledge, which is aligned with our commitment to sourcing 100% sustainable cotton by 2020.” Donna Carpenter, CEO and Co-owner, Burton Snowboards
“It’s been a long journey to reach 100% organic cotton. Kudos to all the prAna employees & global supply chain partners who put in countless hours. We couldn’t be more ecstatic about this sustainability milestone!” Russ Hopcus, President, prAna
“House of Fraser supports the Sustainable Cotton Communiqué as part of our shift to sourcing sustainable cotton in our house branded fashion and homeware products. We welcome the opportunity to collaborate to scale the uptake of sustainable materials in fashion, and applaud HRH The Prince of Wales for his leadership.” Maria Hollins, Executive Director of Buying and Design, House of Fraser
“At Timberland, we strive to be Earthkeepers in everything we do and we recognize sustainable cotton sourcing as a major part of that goal. Studies have shown the positive social benefits to farming communities as well as the potential for these practices to sequester carbon into the soil. This is exciting work as we move beyond just minimizing environmental impacts to strategically creating real environmental and social benefits within the supply chain.” Zachary Angelini, Environmental Stewardship Manager, Timberland

This announcement, made at the annual Textile Exchange conference, follows the launch of the sustainable cotton communiqué at a high level meeting in May this year that was attended by HRH The Prince of Wales and organised by The Prince’s International Sustainability Unit (ISU) in collaboration with Marks & Spencer and The Soil Association (UK).
Information about cotton and sustainability
Cotton is the most abundantly produced natural fibre and its production supports the livelihoods of over 350 million people* . Despite its global importance, cotton production can be beset by a number of environmental and social challenges. Whilst cotton only covers 2.4% of the world’s arable land, it accounts for 6% of global pesticide use . With around 2,720 litres of water needed to make just one t-shirt, conventional cotton production is highly dependent on water . Higher temperatures and changing rainfall patterns caused by climate change are likely to cause severe water shortages in some areas, as well as increase the prevalence of pests and diseases, negatively affect yields. The challenges of the cotton sector are also social and economic, with cotton farmers and their dependents negatively impacted by the over-use of pesticides and petroleum based fertilizers, and rising costs of production and volatile market prices.
More information, This initiative recognises several existing standards as delivering sustainable cotton: Organic, Fairtrade, Better Cotton Initiative (BCI), Cotton Made in Africa and recycled cotton certified to an independently verifiable standard such as the Global Recycled Standard (GRS) or the Recycled Claim Standard (RCS). In addition, CottonConnect’s REEL programme and code provides a starting point for businesses aiming for greater sustainability in their cotton supply chain.
*Fairtrade Foundation, Commodity Briefing: Cotton, 2015

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Fairtrade Tea and Coffee for your workplace……

Fairtrade coffee beans

Are you a coffee connoisseur? Or do you just not care as long as it’s strong and fair? However you like your coffee, when you choose Fairtrade you know you’re supporting the farmers who grew the beans to build a better quality of life for their families and communities. And that’s not all. Did you know that Fairtrade coffee growers invest at least 25 percent of their Fairtrade Premium* in improving the productivity of their farms and the quality of their beans? For example, Fairtrade farmers at Nicaraguan co-operative CECOCAFEN have been investing their Premium in new tools, machinery and training to grow their internationally renowned coffee. They’ve learnt how to maintain the fertility of the rich volcanic soils, and have bought new drying and milling equipment which processes their harvested coffee beans more quickly and consistently so their quality and flavour can be preserved. They’ve also put Premium funds towards their own ‘cupping’ laboratory so their coffee can be taste profiled (a bit like wine!) and sampled before export, helping them to negotiate better prices for their beans.

Ivania    Coffee farmer Ivania Calderón Peralta explains what Fairtrade means to her: ‘In Nicaragua, coffee cultivation is fundamental to the economy. ‘However, volatile coffee prices and climate change make it difficult for a smallholder coffee farmer to make a living from coffee farming. Fairtrade has changed this. ‘Because of Fairtrade the lives and futures of smallholder coffee farmers are more secure.’

There are hundreds of types of Fairtrade coffee available to buy, including beans, roast and ground, instant, and even coffee pods. Speak to your supplier and give it a try!