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Fairtrade welcomes the launch of its first coffee from Java

For the first time UK coffee drinkers will be able to enjoy Fairtrade coffee from the Indonesian island of Java, launched exclusively at Waitrose.

This now means that all of the own-brand coffee sold in Waitrose is 100% Fairtrade.

This news comes as the market price for coffee remains below the Fairtrade Minimum Price, and this new deal will ensure around 150 coffee farmers in the region receive this safety net covering the cost of their coffee production and can develop their farms, and communities with the Fairtrade Premium.

Coffee is the world’s second most traded commodity after oil. The global coffee business is worth over US$200 billion a year.

News

Fairtrade becomes a member of the International Cocoa Initiative

Fairtrade International, representing the world’s most recognized ethical label, has joined the International Cocoa Initiative (ICI) as a Non-Profit Contributing Partner in March 2019.

The partnership will allow the two organizations to learn from each other, improve their existing operating models, and reach more children and their families in cocoa communities in Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana to achieve a shared goal of eliminating child labour and enabling child protection.

“Ending child labour and enabling child protection is an urgent human rights issue, which Fairtrade International has been working on since 2010,” said Dario Soto Abril, CEO of Fairtrade International. “In addition to tackling a root cause of child labour by raising cocoa farmers’ incomes, we at Fairtrade look forward to this new step in the partnership with ICI, an organisation that provides expertise and brings multiple stakeholders together to collectively scale up good practices.”

“We must continue to address child labour through a protection framework on multiple fronts,” said Dr. Nyagoy Nyong’o, Executive Director of the producer network Fairtrade Africa. “This means everything from ensuring a fair price for cocoa so that families can earn a decent living, to providing safe educational opportunities for children, to building awareness on children’s rights, including their right to protection. Working together, we will go further.”

News

How many bananas could you eat in 25 Years? Try the Fairtrade Calculator……..

65 suitcases full! That’s how many bananas I could get through in 25 years. How about you?

Try the Fairtrade Calculator to find out what a quarter-century of tea, coffee, wine or bananas means for you. And what it means for farmers when we go Fairtrade. https://action.fairtrade.org.uk/page/47894/data/1?ea.tracking.id=MSE&utm_medium=email&utm_source=engagingnetworks&utm_campaign=++&utm_content=SC:+Fairtrade+Calculator+A1&ea.url.id=4141630&forwarded=true

Once you’re done, remember to ask your friends and family to try it out too. Let’s celebrate 25 of the FAIRTRADE Mark changing lives.

But the Fairtrade Calculator isn’t just about the last 25 years. It’s about the next 25 years.

Millions of farmers and workers across the planet are still getting a scandalously unfair deal, and the climate crisis – already hitting farmers hard – is making the future even more uncertain.

Tackling low prices and devastating climate change won’t be easy. But the Fairtrade Calculator shows us something important – the little choices we make every day add up to a big difference.

 

 

Events News

Fairtrade Guernsey Beach Art Installation…….Be a womble…..

We will be creating a beach art installation at the Vazon Beach Clean to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Fairtrade Mark.

Meet @ 3.00 p.m., Saturday 21 September (Fort Houmet headland).

Please bring any litter you collect between now and then from any of your wombling adventures to add to the artwork. (Gloves provided).

FREE Fairtrade refreshments, but bring your own cup.

Fairtrade Beach Clean

 

News Products

Are palm oil products bad? What is palm oil and why sustainable palm oil from Ghana and Ecuador is the future…..

Do you avoid products which contain palm oil? How much do you know about sustainable palm oil and how much it differs from regular palm oil? What is FairPalm? To clue yourself up, read on…

You’ll have heard a lot about palm oil on the news recently, but what is palm oil? Are palm oil products bad? And is it possible to buy sustainable palm oil products instead?

At 66 million tons annually, palm oil is the most commonly produced vegetable oil and can be found in almost half of our everyday purchases. Palm oil products are found in every corner of your home, and is hidden away in shampoo, toothpaste, lipstick, and candles as well as everyday foods such as bread, chocolate and instant noodles.

Much of the palm oil we consume every day isn’t sustainable. Big brands understand that people are trying to avoid palm oil, so it’s often hidden in lists of ingredients under different names such as ‘vegetable oil’, or ‘vegetable fat’. Oil palm plantations are developed in low lying, wet, tropical areas – where rainforests and peatland grow and endangered species such as orangutans and tigers live. Clearing for oil palm plantations is devastating for wildlife, habitats, people and climate change.

The good news is we don’t have to avoid all products with palm oil. Some companies source sustainable palm oil, made with respect for the environment and local communities.

Palm oil’s popularity in the manufacturing world is partly due to its high yield. Whilst sunflower oil yields 0.7 tonnes of oil per hectare (and other comparable oils result in similar figures), palm oil yields 3.8 tonnes of oil per hectare. So to acquire 1 tonne of oil, you’d need to farm far fewer palm trees and less land.*

There are areas in the world where palm trees are native, or where they’re farmed mixed cropping. These palm forests provide a home for local wildlife, and can continue to provide a major part of the economy for local people, lifting them out of poverty.

In 2013, Traidcraft joined with the Serendipalm co-operative in Ghana and Natural Habitats in Ecuador to produce Fairtrade, organic palm oil in a way that supports smallholder growers and allows the palm plants to grow naturally.

The palm plants are separated with cocoa trees and natural flora. Both Serendipalm and Natural Habitats are committed to fair trade and organic practices, and support the growers with agricultural training and health care. Neither group use any chemical nasties to increase production or reduce pests – they use organic methods and encourage the palm fruits to grow at their own pace.

Traidcraft called this new oil FairPalm, and used it for its eco-friendly cleaning products and its delicious fair trade biscuits.

Traidcraft mixed together FairPalm, Fairtrade coconut oil from India, and a bouquet of natural essential oils to create Clean & Fair, the world’s first Fairtrade cleaning range. Not only does every purchase of Clean & Fair ensure that growers are paid fairly, communities are given a Fairtrade premium to spend on local initiatives and conserving the environment.

So, are palm oil products bad? They definitely can be. But by buying sustainable palm oil products like that from Ghana and Ecuador, you can help the environment and people in local communities to flourish.

*Figures from European Palm Oil Alliance, 2016

https://www.traidcraftshop.co.uk/blogpost/are-palm-oil-products-bad-what-is-palm-oil-and-why-sustainable-palm-oil-from-ghana-and-ecuador-is-the-future-216-216.html?utm_campaign=1069611_Tuesday%2027-08-2019%20-%20MO%20OLD&utm_medium=email&utm_source=EDM&dm_i=4EDA,MXBF,238P6X,2OZ2O,1

Featured News

How coffee farming is supporting the indigenous population of Guatemala……

In Guatemala, indigenous people make up around 40% of the population, most of whom are of Mayan descent.

Social and economic inequality is widespread among indigenous people in Guatemala and the majority work on small-scale coffee farms. The country’s main exports are coffee beans, sugar and bananas. Historically, Guatemala’s coffee exports have been dominated by large foreign-owned plantations rather than small coffee farms, which has meant that the exporter or the intermediary can take advantage of the farmers, pushing down prices for their crops, often leaving them in poverty and with few other options but to sell up and migrate.

That’s why many co-operatives and small coffee producers team up, like the 20,000 small coffee producers who market their coffee through the Federación de Pequeños Productores de Café de Guatemala (also known as FEDECOCAGUA R.L.). This organisation consists of 148 different co-operatives and it gives farmers better access to global and direct trade. As a result, around 50% of all coffee produced in the country is now from small family-owned coffee farms.

These farmers are now paid fairly for their work and, by creating a community based on fair trade and social inclusion, they are able to work collaboratively whilst maintaining independence.

Read more at: https://www.fairtrade.org.uk/