All Posts By

Steve Mauger

Products

HONEST Value Co-op Fairtrade Instant Coffee

Co-op are proud to champion Fairtrade and sell Fairtrade products conveniently, so that you can make a difference every time you shop with the Co-op.

Co-op Fairtrade Coffee

Buying Fairtrade means you’re making a difference. By choosing this product, you’re helping to bring a meaningful difference to Fairtrade producers and their communities, whilst protecting the environment.

Events

Fairtrade Steering Group AGM

Our AGM will take place on Thursday 20th May at 6.30 pm,  in the Writing Room upstairs at Moores Hotel and a table is booked for dinner afterwards at JB Parker’s. As usual, both the AGM and the dinner are open to partners, friends and other interested parties.

Events Resources

Wave Of Hope for Climate Crisis

It’s so important our Fairtrade community speaks up in conversations about how to tackle the climate crisis.

Because the people behind our foods and goods can and must be part of building the fairer, greener, low-carbon world we all want.

But centuries of unfair trade means governments and businesses in countries like the UK need to make major financial commitments now, so farmers and workers can earn enough to take on the climate crisis they face, and build a sustainable future for their communities.

As hosts of the G7 summit in June and the COP 26 climate summit this Autumn, the UK has the chance to lead the world this year. To convince the world’s wealthiest nations that it’s time to take responsibility for the climate crisis they have largely caused, and that those farmers and workers living with the consequences of climate change must have the power to shape a better future.

Wave-Of-Hope-Supporter-Toolkit

News Products

BUMPER COFFEE HARVEST FOR WORST HIT REGION


It is estimated that 125 million people depend on coffee for their livelihood, from the farmers, to those in transportation, as well as roasters and retailers. Baristas and coffee shops were some of the first to close the doors when lockdown began. Despite this challenging environment, coffee lovers have still sourced their favourite drink, due largely to the resilience of coffee producers and the supply chain. Consumer purchasing of coffee remains buoyant – already the number one e-commerce grocery product before the pandemic – the growing trend for online coffee subscriptions is key to this success.

Latin America has faced many challenges in the wake of Covid-19; reported at one point to be one of the worst hit regions in the world. The coffee growing countries of Honduras and Peru were impacted by severe lockdown restrictions, which affected the entire production process. However, despite this, many farmers reported a bumper harvest, surpassing expectations. Nevertheless, the volatility of global coffee prices continues due to uncertainty in the market, with ongoing speculation about supply and demand. We caught up with our regional team to understand more about the opportunities and challenges currently facing co-operatives and communities.

Lending Manager for Central America, Marco Garcia, said: “During the first wave of Covid-19, the major issue for our customers proved to be buyers cancelling or postponing contracts, due to the uncertain demand caused by lockdown. With the exception of Nicaragua (where the government did not impose restrictions), a general challenge for our producers was to maintain operations, with travel restrictions affecting export. For the current season, we expect a less complicated scenario, since buyers and farmers have made adjustments so they can continue to trade.”

The high altitude and rich soils of the Copán region of Honduras, are perfect for coffee growing and farmers here produce some of the highest quality beans in Central America. In 2014, a group of 25 farmers came together with the ambition to export this premium quality coffee to customers worldwide. They became known as Cafescor, and since then they have grown their membership to over 400 coffee farmers. In 2019, they became a Shared Interest customer and began to focus their efforts on enhancing the quality of their coffee even further, and as a result, improving the quality of life for farmers.

General Manager of Cafescor, Herminio Perdomo, said: “Shared Interest finance allows Cafescor to continue supporting farmers with timely payments for their produce.”

We asked Hermino about the impact Covid-19 has had on the co-operative. He said: “During 2020, the general population had to respect strict travel restrictions that allowed each citizen to work only one day out of five, based on their national ID number. Therefore, staff attended the production plant on a rotation basis for some months. In addition, coffee co-operatives in Honduras had to request a special working permit that allowed the operation of the production facility and the transport of some staff members to the premises. In 2021, the government has not requested this special permit anymore. We have adapted our operations to continue with production plans. To date, we have gathered 90% of the forecasted volume for the ongoing cycle thanks to good planning.”

 

 

Featured News

Climate Crisis and Fairtrade Farmers…..

Fairtrade farmers are among the people who have contributed the least to climate crisis – but are already feeling the worst effects. 17 people from Cote d’Ivoire have the same carbon footprint as one person in the UK, but studies have shown that Africa is the continent most vulnerable to climate change.

But across Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean and Oceania, it is small-scale farmers who are often feeling the worst effects of climate breakdown. This is because they are less likely to earn a living income due to exploitative global trade and more likely to rely directly on the land they farm for their livelihoods. Climate change is making it harder to farm the land productively, while rigged trade systems which favour the powerful leave farmers unable to earn enough to adapt to the rapidly changing climate.

Ebrottié Tanoh Florentin, a cocoa farmer in Côte d’Ivoire, talks about what climate change means for cocoa farming communities in West Africa. ‘Climate change is a global issue. We, the farmers, have to deal with its consequences every day. For instance, this year we lacked food because of the heat. The production decreased this year too, so this affects the economy. People harvested less and received less money. So we all suffer from the negative consequences of the climate: it impacts the environment and our economy.’

Read three more stories of Fairtrade farmers taking on the climate crisis.

News Products

Lets make this Easter Eggstra Special…..

Around 80m of these Easter goodies fly off UK shelves around this time of year, and so let’s egg on our friends and family to go Fairtrade for their seasonal chocolatey treat.

Because more of us choosing Fairtrade means more power and more pay in the hands of the hard-working cocoa farmers behind those Easter eggs.

And that means whole communities with more control over their future, and with more resources to build better lives and take on the climate crisis.

So let’s share the good news that this Easter it’s extra easy to take a bite in the right direction!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0yr07ew6TY

Bengaly Bourama portrait next to sacks of cocoa beans

“WE HAVE BEEN ABLE TO BUILD A SCHOOL, ACCOMMODATION FOR THE TEACHERS OF THE SCHOOL, WE HAVE RENOVATED THE HOSPITAL, WE HAVE GIVEN AN AMBULANCE TO THE HOSPITAL, ALL OF THIS WITH THE FAIRTRADE PREMIUM. AND WE HAVE A PROJECT TO BUILD THE HEADQUARTERS THAT THE CO-OPERATIVE DESERVES BY THE END OF THE YEAR. WITHOUT FAIRTRADE WE WOULDN’T BE IN THIS POSITION.”

BENGALY BOURAMA, SECRETARY GENERAL OF THE COOBADI CO-OPERATIVE IN CÔTE D’IVOIRE